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Debunking The Myth: Removing Teeth As A Cure For Gum Disease

Debunking The Myth: Removing Teeth As A Cure For Gum Disease

The short answer is “no.” Gum disease attacks the soft oral tissues of the mouth and bones that surround your tooth structures. 

Just because one or more of your teeth may no longer be present doesn’t mean the infection doesn’t exist.

Removing teeth is not a cure for gum disease. While it may be suggested as a treatment option in severe cases, tooth extraction does not address the underlying cause of gum disease, which is plaque buildup and bacterial infection. 

Even if some teeth are extracted, the remaining teeth and gums can still be affected by gum disease. 

Why removing teeth may not be a cure for gum disease

While removing teeth may seem like a logical solution for severe cases of gum disease, it is not necessarily a cure. Here are some reasons why:

  • Removing teeth does not address the underlying cause of gum disease, which is plaque buildup and bacterial infection. Even if some teeth are extracted, the remaining teeth and gums can still be affected by gum disease.
  • Tooth extraction can be a risky and complicated procedure that may lead to pain, infection, and other complications. It can also cause changes in bite or speech and have cosmetic and psychological implications for patients, especially if the extracted teeth are visible in the smile zone.
  • Tooth extraction is a last resort and should only be considered when all other treatment options have been exhausted.

When Tooth Extraction May Be Necessary for Gum Disease

There are some cases where tooth extraction may be recommended as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for gum disease. These include:

  • Severe damage: If a tooth is severely damaged or decayed and cannot be restored with a filling or crown, it may need to be extracted to prevent further infection and complications.
  • Loose teeth: If the teeth are loose due to bone loss or gum recession, they may need to be extracted to prevent them from falling out or causing further damage.
  • Orthodontic treatment: In some cases, tooth extraction may be necessary to make room for orthodontic treatment, such as braces or Invisalign.

Take away

In summary, while removing teeth may be suggested as a treatment option for severe cases of gum disease, it is not a cure. 

Tooth extraction does not address the underlying cause of gum disease and can be a complicated and risky procedure. 

Instead, non-surgical and surgical treatments, as well as lifestyle changes, can help control gum disease and prevent further complications. 

If you have concerns about gum disease or are considering tooth extraction, be sure to talk to your dentist or periodontist to determine the best course of action for your individual needs.Or alternatively contact us we would be happy to assist.

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